“DON’T FORGET SEPTEMBER “

September is  World Alzheimers Month,  although I would not have known, if I had not been reading my copy of the Trinidad and Tobago Newsday newspaper.   Sadly I was not lying on a beach in the Caribbean at the time 🙂   I guess not too many people read this paper, so I wonder how many of the worlds’ population know about ” WORLD ALZHEIMERS MONTH ”  ?

They should do, because millions of people around the world suffer from the disease —  35,000,000 is the best estimate I can find.   Furthermore, the numbers are increasing drammatically as the global population ages and currently, there is still no cure in sight.  This is truly a pandemic of epic proportions, which could engulf our ageing societies, particularly in the west and in Japan. It will put enormous pressure on health services and an unbearable burden on relatives all around the world.

Dementia is the very first thing I blogged about way back in February 2010, under the heading “Lest We Forget”.   { All my earlier posts on this subject can be found by clicking on ‘dementia’  in the TOPICS list. }   For this month I will write an additional blog each week on the subject and see if I can find some positive examples on the web of significant  progress in treating this most challenging of illnesses.

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3 Responses to “DON’T FORGET SEPTEMBER “

  1. Jon Cleaver says:

    Four old ladies sit playing mahjong in a courtyard. Suddenly the water pipes burst and the place is flooded.

    When the plumbers arrive they find the four ladies still engrossed in their game, the water has risen up to their knees and they have not noticed. One of the ladies looks nonchalantly up and asks of the plumbers “What took you so long?”

    The game of mahjong is said to have originated from either the Tang Dynasty (618-907) or the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) it has now spread around the world where it is estimated that about 600million people play.

    The moral of this story is that while not a cure for Alzheimer’s the Chinese believe it is a good preventative. Wu Xiuqionq is aged 103 and lives in South China; she has played mahjong all her life, and says “I pay tribute to the game of mahjong, which I play every day, for its role in my longevity.”

    Another stalwart Yu Guangyuan 96 an economist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences has spent much of his elderly years propagating mahjong and is among its most ardent supporters of mahjong as a promoter of health and wellbeing.

    Jon

  2. Jon Cleaver says:

    Four old ladies sit playing mahjong in a courtyard. Suddenly the water pipes burst and the place is flooded.

    When the plumbers arrive they find the four ladies still engrossed in their game, the water has risen up to their knees and they have not noticed. One of the ladies looks nonchalantly up and asks of the plumbers “What took you so long?”

    The game of mahjong is said to have originated from either the Tang Dynasty (618-907) or the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) it has now spread around the world where it is estimated that about 600million people play.

    The moral of this story is that while not a cure for Alzheimer’s the Chinese believe it is a good preventative. Wu Xiuqionq is aged 103 and lives in South China; she has played mahjong all her life, and says “I pay tribute to the game of mahjong, which I play every day, for its role in my longevity.”

    Another stalwart Yu Guangyuan 96 an economist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences has spent much of his elderly years propagating mahjong and is among its most ardent supporters of mahjong as a promoter of health and wellbeing.

    PS I have sent a picture of Wu Xiuqionq via you e-mail John. Cheers.

    Jon

  3. MaH Jong, excellent game, and the tiles make a lovely site when the walls are built, the dice thrown, and no weaknesses to let in the dragons. Played with the family last week with a chinese set, (tiles) Their were no numbers to any set (Characters/bamboos or sticks/circles), or characters-Western to the winds(North East South and West. It made great fun to play, as one tried to remember the sequencing for a character kong or pung, and the name of a wind as it was disgarded. Memory what is that? I had to go back to my youth and reminice on how to play-Limit hands and scoring. You can make the game as easy or as complicated as one would wish. In the Chinese tile set I played with this week end one had pretties (4 off), Seasons(4 off), and a another set of four tiles; take any four from(Hen&worm:Man&bag of gold; cat&mouse;Angler&fish) These tiles complete the game when scoring/gambling and playing for matches. Being a pensioner and retired, I have no pot of gold to gamble with? Just friends and family to pass a pleasant evening.

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